StMU Research Scholars

Featuring Scholarly Research, Writing, and Media at St. Mary’s University

April 4, 2023

AI-Generated Art: Is this the Rise or Fall of Human Creativity?

“The development of full artificial intelligence could spell the end of the human race… It would take off on its own, and re-design itself at an ever-increasing rate. Humans, who are limited by slow biological evolution, couldn’t compete, and would be superseded.” —Stephen Hawking, BBC (2014)

Imagine a world where you could use technology that will personally recommend for you a song based on what you are currently listening to, and a world where face recognition is used to access your most sensitive information. Imagine a world where a teacher can ask specific software to develop a complete and comprehensive lesson plan on the US Civil War that includes group activities and homework, a world where you can create an artistic masterpiece by just entering the right keywords into specific software. Well, we don’t have to think of some distant future; all these scenarios are possible with the advancement of AI technology.1

Alan Turing, 1951 courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, London

What was once thought of as just science fiction is now our reality. But when mid-20th century logician Alan Turing first started his work with artificial intelligence, little would he have known how much his work would influence the world a century later.2 Turing’s creation of the Turing Machine in 1936 was an abstract computational model capable of solving problems in computer science and testing the limits of computation. We can see the influence of his work in every algorithm encounter we run into daily. The framework of his exploration also posed the question that if humans can make their own decisions, why couldn’t machines also do the same?3

Within the last 25 years, we have seen an explosion of AI technology that has made it more accessible and powerful than ever before. It has impacted the way we live and interact with each other. AI systems have developed the power to perform sophisticated calculations by analyzing large amounts of data to identify patterns to help businesses make better decisions.4

“As more and more artificial intelligence is entering into the world, more and more emotional intelligence must enter into leadership.” — Amit Ray, AI Scientist (2018)

Example of the DALL-E 2 AI generator sharing the results of a specific prompt.

Recently, AI technology has impacted an unexpected area: the world of art. If you have social media, you may have seen the sudden uprising of AI-generated artwork across your timelines, feeds and user profiles. AI art generators like DALL-E 2 allow you to type up a prompt that is as detailed or vague as you like and has an image created for you instantly. When given the prompt “a bowl of soup that is a portal to another dimension as digital art,” the results are remarkable.5 DALL-E 2 cannot only modify existing images but also combine images to create new compositions.

Another example of the AI generation taking over social media can be seen with the worldwide use of the Lensa AI app. Lensa AI can generate hyper-realistic stylized avatars from existing images.6 We can see from the example that when senior writer Sarah Cascone used the Lensa app, about 1oo images were created based on 2o of her own photos. The results varied and showed different styles like fantasy, fairy, kawaii and cosmic. The remarkable thing about this app is that it can easily create multiple images in a few moments compared to the time it would take for a professionally trained artist to produce the same images.7

Lensa AI generated avatar images—photo courtesy of Sarah Cascone.

The rise of AI-generated art is most certainly a trend that is sweeping social media platforms, but have we stopped to think about how these AI generators can create this art? When it comes to ethics, are we asking the right questions?

“The real question is, when will we draft an artificial intelligence bill of rights? What will that consist of? And who will get to decide that?” — Gray Scott, Artist and Philosopher

When exciting new apps arise, it’s common for most social media users to want to explore the latest social media trends. When AI-generated art began appearing on social media platforms like Instagram, Facebook and Twitter, some users questioned how these AI generators could create such realistic artwork. For these AI image generators to work, it needs to be fed millions of images to train themselves on how to reproduce similar images.8 When artist Kelly McKernan realized that her name had been used in over twelve thousand public prompts within the AI generator Midjourney, she filed a class-action lawsuit against Midjouney and two other AI image generators, DreamUp and Stable Diffusion. When McKernan’s name was included in these prompts, her distinct art style of mixing Art Nouveau and science fiction created images similar to her artwork. McKernan argues that artists have not consented to have their copyrighted work included in the database of inspiration that helps the AI software produce the images. McKernan’s class-action lawsuit also explains that the artists were not credited nor compensated for their involvement.9

Example of an AI-generated image. Image courtesy of Freepik.

The question of authorship is also something that should be considered. Who owns AI-generated art, the human or the AI program? Both are essential to the development of the artwork. The human must tell the AI program what they want it to create, but the AI program ultimately does the work to produce the artwork. Also, consider that while a human is giving the command to the AI generator, the AI generator is eventually making its own choices of how the artwork should look. At the moment, copyright laws in the US have yet to catch up to answer this question. The law will have to adapt or not.10 For the law to change, lawmakers must perform a massive rewrite to define copyright rules between humans and AI. Some suggest that we treat AI software as an employee hired to perform a task that would make the artwork eligible for copyright.11 Is this fair or will AI businesses fight this change?

“If the government regulates against the use of drones of stem cells or artificial intelligence, all that means is that the work and the research leave the borders of that country and go someplace else.” —Peter Diamandis, CEO and Entrepreneur.

Example of an AI-generated landscape image. Image courtesy of ArtStation.

While policymakers attempt to begin AI regulation, 12 we should also question how the rise of AI-generated art will affect artistic professionals. Usually, if you want to become a professional artist that creates illustrations, it takes years and years of constant practice with unwavering discipline.13 With the ease and accessibility of AI image generators to images used for social media and personal use, the work given to professional artists can now be done by artificial intelligence for a fraction of the price and a fraction of the time. Will everyday users choose AI to cut costs to have more control over the end product? Only time may tell.

The future of AI and its effects on the world is uncertain, but we can expect it to continue to spread into more aspects of our lives. We are used to hearing someone say, “Alexa, what’s the weather like?” but can you imagine AI that can perform more than its designated task? Imagine AI that can think freely while having the ability to learn, perform and adapt under any circumstance. AI developers are working fast to take significant steps to make this a reality. 14 While the advancements in AI seem to grow almost daily and policymakers work to regulate AI, we should all take a minute to consider how AI may affect our own lives and professions.

 

  1. Fanti, Lucrezia, Dario Guarascio, and Massimo Moggi. “From Heron of Alexandria to Amazon’s Alexa: A Stylized History of AI and Its Impact on Business Models, Organization and Work.” Journal of Industrial and Business Economics 49, no. 3 (September 2022): 409–40. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40812-022-00222-4.
  2. Lenat, Douglas B. 2016. “WWTS (What Would Turing Say?)”. AI Magazine 37 (1):97-101. https://doi.org/10.1609/aimag.v37i1.2644., 97.
  3.  Boker, Udi, and Nachum Dershowitz. “The Influence of Domain Interpretations on Computational Models.” Applied Mathematics and Computation, Physics and Computation, 215, no. 4 (October 15, 2009): 1323–39. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amc.2009.04.063.
  4.  Alter, Steven. “Understanding Artificial Intelligence in the Context of Usage: Contributions and Smartness of Algorithmic Capabilities in Work Systems.” International Journal of Information Management 67 (December 1, 2022): 102392. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijinfomgt.2021.102392.
  5.  News, Tutorials, AI Research. “How DALL-E 2 Actually Works,” April 19, 2022. https://www.assemblyai.com/blog/how-dall-e-2-actually-works/.
  6.  Darbinyan, Rem. “Council Post: How AI Transforms Social Media.” Forbes. Accessed April 1, 2023. https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbestechcouncil/2023/03/16/how-ai-transforms-social-media/.
  7.  “I Uploaded Photos of Myself to the New Lensa A.I. Portrait Generator. The Results Were Stunning, Strange… and Super Creepy.” Accessed April 2, 2023. https://news.artnet.com/art-world/lensa-ai-avatar-results-2225393.
  8.  Darling, Grant. “Is AI Art Really Theft? The Ethicality of AI Art Generators.” thecodebytes, February 11, 2023. https://thecodebytes.com/is-ai-art-theft/.
  9. “Is A.I. Art Stealing from Artists? | The New Yorker.” Accessed April 2, 2023. https://www.newyorker.com/culture/infinite-scroll/is-ai-art-stealing-from-artists.
  10.  Škiljić, Alina. “When Art Meets Technology or Vice Versa: Key Challenges at the Crossroads of AI-Generated Artworks and Copyright Law.” IIC – International Review of Intellectual Property and Competition Law 52, no. 10 (November 2021): 1338–69. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40319-021-01119-w, Pg 9.
  11.  Škiljić, Alina. “When Art Meets Technology or Vice Versa: Key Challenges at the Crossroads of AI-Generated Artworks and Copyright Law.” IIC – International Review of Intellectual Property and Competition Law 52, no. 10 (November 2021): 1338–69. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40319-021-01119-w, Pg 11
  12.  Schuett, Jonas. “Defining the Scope of AI Regulations.” Law, Innovation & Technology, March 4, 2023, 1–23. https://doi.org/10.1080/17579961.2023.2184135.
  13.  How to Become a Professional Artist. Accessed April 2, 2023. https://video.alexanderstreet.com/watch/how-to-become-a-professional-artist.
  14. Kelly Carman, “The Genie Is out of the Bottle: What Do We Wish for the Future of AI?,” Penn State Journal of Law and International Affairs 9, no. 1 (2020): 180-215, Pg 190.

Tags from the story

AI

artificial intelligence

Computer generated art work

copyright

DALL-E 2

Lensa AI

Nomination-Social-Sciences

Charles Perez

Charles Perez graduated with a B.F.A. in Graphic Design from the University of the Incarnate Word. Charles works in the Office of University Communications at St. Mary’s University as a Graphic Designer. He is the Art Director for the Law Edition of Gold & Blue magazine. He is working on obtaining his M.A. in Communication Studies at St. Mary’s University.

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Recent Comments

Sofia Perez

Hi Charles! First off, I wanna say that the picture you posted as the head is very nice! I honestly believe that through the use of AI’s, we can have a whole different world and we are starting to see more of these operations being used in many different places. I agree that we can be uncertain of many things about that which we don’t know, but AI’s can affect our lives for the better as well.

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28/04/2023

11:55 am

Melanie Fraire

I really enjoyed reading this article considering the rising popularity of using AI as well as the awareness that is being spread regarding the potential negatives and drawbacks to it. This was a great article overall and it was very informative.

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28/04/2023

11:55 am

Nnamdi Onwuzurike

Congratulations on your nomination! This article offers an intriguing exploration of the impact of AI-generated art on human creativity. The author considers the potential benefits and drawbacks of using AI in the artistic process, and raises important questions about the role of humans in the creation and interpretation of art. While AI-generated art offers exciting new possibilities for creativity and innovation, the article emphasizes the importance of preserving human agency and creativity in the face of technological advances.

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28/04/2023

11:55 am

Muhammad Hammad Zafar

Well written and explained, specifically by mentioning the AI-generated art and all the development of art work by AI, but as said that at the end, rather than precisely following commands, everything will be according to the choice of AI. Well, there will be no meaning and emotions in the art hence it will never give the vibe as compared to art made by human.

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28/04/2023

11:55 am

Karah Renfroe

I enjoyed the exploration into AI. This is a topic many people are just now becoming familiar with. I think the potential of AI is interesting, and even a bit uneasy. There was been much talk over the fears of AI taking jobs from people, but to look into its creative potential is another unique angle to view it from. I actually see a lot of AI generated art on TikTok, so I believe this is becoming more and more popular. While I do think It is cool and different, I do worry that It takes away the “magic” of human created art pieces and the amount of effort and individuality that goes into it.

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28/04/2023

11:55 am

Osondra Fournier-Colon

Congratulations on your nomination Charles; such an exciting article about A-I and how it affects human creativity. I am uncomfortable using A-I as a source of creativity because it takes so much value away from an artist. However, you did a great job describing the effects of this type of A-I usage and its impacts on human creativity. Great article!

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28/04/2023

11:55 am

Alanna Hernandez

The quote at the beginning is scary to think about as 2014 AI is nowhere as advanced as the AI. We are dealing with now. with the masses only having an issue with people able to use AI due to copyright laws as means to capitalize off a very cool tool. Human curiosity is one thing aI might not be able to imitate.

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28/04/2023

11:55 am

Peter Alva

AI-generated art is definitely not the end. When I as someone who consumes that kind of art especially AI-generated music you can see the Non-Human aspect. I do think there is a market for this kind of art and the people who run that AI will be the ones profiting but I do think that at some point Human creativity will leave that art and people will look back at Human art and believe that its amazing and start comparing us to AI instead of it being the other way around. Congrats on the nomination this article is amazing.

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28/04/2023

11:55 am

Maximillian Morise

The renaissance of AI artwork has left many feeling very anxious about the future of Human creativity and artwork as a whole, and your article does a good job delving deep into that anxiety and the implications it has. Congratulations on your article and your nomination!

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30/04/2023

11:55 am

Illeana Molina

Congratulations on your nomination! This article offers an in-depth analysis of how AI has taken over our society and how art/creativity comes into play when looking at AI. I like how the author brings in the pros and cons of using AI and the questions/doubts that may come with that. I do agree with the ability to preserve human creativity and collaboration rather than give it to technological advances/computers. I am not going to lie; I am nervous about what is to come, as AI is smart and can do a lot.

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08/05/2023

11:55 am

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